New Cars More Likely to Include Crash-avoiding Safety Technology


On Wednesday, the IIHS said automakers are currently on track to meet the goal of ensuring that all new cars have standard automatic emergency braking by 2022.

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Almost half the new vehicles produced in America between September 2017 and August 2018 left factories with automatic emergency braking systems. The IIHS also collected similar data for 2017, and only a third of the new cars built had this potentially life-saving technology. Almost 2.2 million (out of 2.5 million) cars that Toyota built during the period had automatic emergency braking systems, making it one of the largest producers of vehicles with the technology. However, Nissan came in a close second with almost 1.1 million (out of 1.4 million) cars built having the automatic emergency braking technology.

Who Hasn’t Made the Cut?

Right now, the Jaguar Land Rover has not built a single US-market-based vehicle with the automatic emergency braking system during the most current study period, though almost two-thirds of the British automaker’s models (2019) now have the technology as standard. Along with such, Mitsubishi, Porsche, and Ford/Lincoln aren’t up to speed. Most of these automakers have built less than 10 percent of their vehicles with the technology during this study period.

However, more 2019 vehicles have automatic emergency braking systems as standard technology than ever made before. This comes directly from information compiled by Consumer Reports for the IIHS. All 2019 Tesla and Volvo vehicles (for the US market) have the technology included, and over 80 percent of 2019 Mercedes-Benz, Toyota/Lexus, BMW, and Audi models also include the technology as standard.

Other automakers that are lagging in the industry and haven’t made the automatic emergency braking system standard equipment on any 2019 models include Mitsubishi, General Motors, and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. However, the 20 primary automakers that have agreed to include the system as standard covers almost 99 percent of all new vehicles in the US (for 2022).

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New Cars More Likely to Include Crash-avoiding Safety Technology

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